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Why Using Lemongrass Essential Oil Benefits Us



What Is It?


Lemongrass is a tropical, grassy plant used in cooking and herbal medicine. Extracted from the leaves and stalks of the lemongrass plant, lemongrass oil has a powerful, citrus scent. It’s often found in soaps and other personal care products.


Lemongrass oil can be extracted, and it’s been used by healthcare providers to treat digestive problems and high blood pressure. It has many other potential health benefits, too.


In fact, lemongrass essential oil is a popular tool in aromatherapy to help relieve stress, anxiety, and depression. Keep reading to learn more about how you can use lemongrass essential oil to improve your well-being.



1. It Has Antibacterial Properties


Lemongrass is used as a natural remedy to heal wounds and help prevent infection. Research from 2010 found that lemongrass essential oil was effective against a variety of drug-resistant bacteria, including those that cause:


  1. skin infections
  2. pneumonia
  3. blood infections
  4. serious intestinal infections


2. It Has Antifungal Properties


Fungi are organisms like yeast and mold. According to a study from 1996, lemongrass oil was an effective deterrent against four types of fungi. One type causes athlete’s foot, ringworm, and jock itch.


Researchers found that at least 2.5 percent of the solution must be lemongrass oil to be effective.



3. It Has Anti-Inflammatory Properties


Chronic inflammation is thought to cause many health problems, including arthritis, cardiovascular disease, and even cancer. Lemongrass contains citral, an anti-inflammatory compound.


According to a 2014 study on animalsTrusted Source, oral lemongrass essential oil showed powerful anti-inflammatory abilities on mice with carrageenan-induced paw edema. The oil also demonstrated anti-inflammatory effects when applied topically on mice with ear edema.



4. It Has Antioxidant Properties


Antioxidants help your body fight off free radicals that damage cells. Research has shown that lemongrass essential oil helps hunt free radicals.


According to a 2015 study, lemongrass oil mouthwash showed strong antioxidant abilities. Researchers suggest it’s a potential complementary therapy for nonsurgical dental procedures and gingivitis.



5. It May Help Prevent Gastric Ulcers Or Relieve Nausea


Lemongrass is used as a folk remedy for a number of digestive problems, ranging from stomachaches to gastric ulcers. According to a 2012 study on mice, lemongrass essential oil helped prevent gastric ulcers, a common cause of stomach pain.


Lemongrass is also a common ingredient in herbal teas and supplements for nausea. Although most herbal products use dried lemongrass leaves, using the essential oil for aromatherapy may provide similar benefits.



6. It May Help Ease Diarrhea


Diarrhea is often just a bother, but it can also cause dehydration. Over-the-counter diarrhea remedies can come with unpleasant side effects like constipation, leading some people to turn to natural remedies.


According to a 2006 study, lemongrass may help slow diarrhea. The study showed that the oil reduced fecal output in mice with castor oil-induced diarrhea, possibly by slowing intestinal motility.



7. It May Help Reduce Cholesterol


High cholesterol may increase your risk of heart attack and stroke. It’s important to keep your cholesterol levels stable.


Lemongrass is traditionally used to treat high cholesterol and manage heart disease.


A 2007 study helps support its use for those conditions. The study found lemongrass oil significantly reduced cholesterol in rats who had been fed a high cholesterol diet for 14 days.


The positive reaction was dose dependent, which means that its effects changed when the dose was changed.



8. It May Help Regulate Blood Sugar And Lipids


Lemongrass oil may help reduce blood sugar in people with type 2 diabetes, according to a 2007 study on rats. For the study, the rats were treated with a daily oral dose of 125 to 500 milligrams of lemongrass oil for 42 days.


Results showed lemongrass oil lowered blood sugar levels. It also changed lipid parameters while increasing HDL (good) cholesterol levels.



9. It May Act As A Pain Reliever


The citral in lemongrass essential oil may help ease pain as it relieves inflammation. According to a 2017 study on people with rheumatoid arthritis, topical lemongrass oil decreased their arthritis pain. On average, pain levels were gradually reduced from 80 to 50 percent within 30 days.



10. It May Help Relieve Stress And Anxiety


High blood pressure is a common side effect of stress. Many studies have shown that aromatherapy eases stress and anxiety. Combining aromatherapy with massage may bring greater benefits.


A 2015 study evaluated the effects of lemongrass and sweet almond massage oil during massage.


Study participants who received a massage using the oil once a week for 3 weeks had lower diastolic blood pressure than those in the control group. Systolic blood pressure and pulse rate weren’t affected.



11. It May Help Relieve Headaches And Migraine


According to researchers in Australia, native Australian lemongrass may relieve pain caused by headaches and migraine. The researchers believe that a compound in lemongrass called eugenol has similar abilities to aspirin.


Eugenol is thought to prevent blood platelets from clumping together. It also releases serotonin. Serotonin is a hormone that regulates mood, sleep, appetite, and cognitive functions.



How To Use


Most scientific research on lemongrass essential oil has been done on animals or in vitro — not on humans. As a result, there’s no standardized dose to treat any condition. It’s unclear if animal doses would have the same effects on humans.


To use lemongrass in aromatherapy, add up to 12 drops of essential oil to 1 teaspoon carrier oil, such as coconut oil, sweet almond oil, or jojoba oil. Mix into a warm bath or massage into your skin.


It’s a good idea to do a patch test before using a diluted essential oil more widely on your skin. This will help you see how your skin reacts to the substance. Here’s how to perform one:


  1. Wash your forearm with mild, unscented soap, then pat the area dry.
  2. Apply a few drops of the diluted essential oil to a small patch of skin on your forearm.
  3. Cover the area with a bandage, then wait 24 hours.


If you notice any signs of discomfort within the 24 hours, such as redness, blistering, or irritation, remove the bandage and wash your skin with mild soap and water. But if you don’t experience any discomfort after 24 hours, the diluted essential oil is likely safe for use.


Never apply essential oils directly to your skin.


You can also inhale lemongrass essential oil directly. Add a few drops to a cotton ball or handkerchief and breathe in the aroma. Some people massage the diluted essential oil into their temples to help relieve headaches.


Shop for the essentials online:


  1. organic lemongrass oil
  2. coconut oil
  3. sweet almond oil
  4. jojoba oil
  5. cotton balls


Remember that essential oils aren’t regulated by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). It’s hard to know for sure if you’re buying a pure product, so you should only purchase from manufacturers you trust.


Look for organic oils manufactured by a brand that’s a member of the National Association for Holistic Aromatherapy.



Possible Side Effects And Risks


Lemongrass essential oil is highly concentrated. Its side effects aren’t well-studied. In some people, they may be stronger than the side effects of the lemongrass plant.


Lemongrass may cause an allergic reaction or skin irritation when used topically.


Other reported side effects of oral lemongrass include:


  1. dizziness
  2. drowsiness
  3. increased appetite
  4. increased urination


Essential oils may be toxic when ingested. You shouldn’t ingest lemongrass essential oil unless you are under the care of a healthcare provider who will monitor your treatment.


Lemongrass, in its plant form, is generally safe to use in food and beverages. Higher amounts may increase your risk of developing side effects.


You should also talk to your doctor before use if you:


  1. have diabetes or low blood sugar
  2. have a respiratory condition, such as asthma
  3. have liver disease
  4. are undergoing chemotherapy
  5. are pregnant
  6. are breastfeeding


You shouldn’t use lemongrass as a complementary therapy or in place of your regular treatment for any condition, unless under your doctor’s guidance and supervision.



The Bottom Line


Some research has shown that lemongrass essential oil has powerful antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antifungal, and astringent abilities. Still, more studies are needed on humans before it can be recommended as a mainstream treatment.


Until lemongrass essential oil is proven safe and effective, you may want to drink lemongrass tea — with your doctor’s approval — as a natural remedy for stomach problems and other conditions. To make:


  1. Add a few stalks of fresh lemongrass, or a few fresh or dried lemongrass leaves to 2 cups boiling water.
  2. Steep for several minutes.
  3. Strain and enjoy.


Drink lemongrass tea in moderation.



Sources:


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    10.1016/j.jep.2007.03.034
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    academicjournals.org/journal/AJB/article-abstract/6AE822C6504
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  4. Boukhatem MN, et al. (2014). Lemongrass (Cymbopogon citratus) essential oil as a potent anti-inflammatory and antifungal drug. DOI:
    10.3402/ljm.v9.25431
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    10.4103/0975-1483.93578
  7. Grice DI, et al. (2011). Isolation of bioactive compounds that relate to the anti-platelet activity of Cymbopogon ambiguus. DOI:
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  9. Lawrence R, et al. (2015). Antioxidant activity of lemongrass essential oil (Cymbopogon citratus) grown in North Indian plains.
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  10. Lemongrass. (2020).
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  12. Methods of application. (n.d.).
    naha.org/explore-aromatherapy/about-aromatherapy/methods-of-application/
  13. Naik MI, et al. (2010). Antibacterial activity of lemongrass (Cymbopogon citratus) oil against some selected pathogenic bacterias. DOI:
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Important Notice: This article was originally published at www.healthline.com by the Healthline Editorial Team where all credits are due. Medically reviewed by Debra Sullivan, Ph.D., MSN, R.N., CNE, COI.

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